Recorder Band

Introduction to the course

This music course – for descant recorder, percussion and voice – is designed to be led by teachers with no musical experience or training. Each lesson has a lesson plan detailing a step-by-step procedure.

The teacher conducts the lesson using a smartboard connected to a laptop. The laptop displays the lesson plan in the form of a picker-wheel showing the heading for each successive activity.

See Lesson Formats for full details.

Pupils learn to play recorder and percussion from standard musical notation at sight right from the beginning.

The course falls into 33 lessons – 11 lessons per term – which can extend over one academic year.

It is essential to begin the course by going through the Instructions with the students.

National Curriculum – Music Key Stage 2:

Purpose of study

‘Music is a universal language’

  • As well as music theory appropriate to this stage the course uniquely includes full musical literacy – with pupils sight-reading standard musical notation right from the start. This literacy is used to enable and complement the emotional, artistic and intellectual growth of the pupils’ musicality and to give the music theory a much fuller practical context.

‘Engage and inspire pupils’

  • The app is modern – the first to use app technology to teach the ancient skill of music reading systematically.

‘Develop a love of music and their talent as musicians’

  • Musical literacy is a skill not a privilege. It should be an essential element in any pupil’s life-long journey of musical discovery. Using it, they continue to discover their rich musical heritage.

‘Self-confidence, creativity and sense of achievement’

  • The course’s well-defined musical challenges and goals create the conditions for all three. The ability to read music means that students can write it too, giving them a solid practical basis for creating their own music even more successfully.

‘Critical engagement with music’

  • Class, individual and peer assessment, often with tight success criteria, and frequent opportunities for peer differentiation ensure this engagement.

‘Compose, and listen with discrimination’

  • Standard musical notation becomes a new vehicle for pupils’ creativity and discernment.

Aims

‘Perform, listen to, review and evaluate music’

  • The course contains 26 well-known pieces – played in ensemble – from the folk, classical and children’s-song canons, drawn from a variety of countries and cultures.

See Song List.

‘Sing, create, compose, and learn a musical instrument’

  • During each lesson pupils take turns in playing recorder and percussion and singing. They create recorder and vocal parts for their peers to perform at sight.

‘Understand and explore music’

  • Pitch, duration, dynamics, tempo, timbre, texture, structure and appropriate musical notations are all taught.

See Technical Course Content.

Learning outcomes

The overall objectives of the 33-lesson course

  • I can play eleven notes on the recorder from standard musical notation
  • I can play simple percussion from standard drum notation
  • I am familiar with other musical elements such as time and key signatures, and rests and accidentals
  • I have learned the essential skill of reading ahead
  • I can sing to a recorder + percussion + given piano accompaniment
  • I am aware of unacceptable behaviour such as playing at inappropriate moments and over-blowing
  • I can appraise the music with verbal descriptions of its emotional effect on me
  • I have improved control of left and right hand fingers as they make each note
  • I can happily take part in a short public concert of recorders, percussion and song at the end of each third of the course

Music Input

  • Treble clef
  • Drum clef
  • Descant recorder notes C4, D4, E4, F4, Fsh4, G4, A4, Bflat4, B4, C5, D5
  • Drum notation symbols for ride cymbal, tom-tom, snare drum and bass drum
  • 24 time signature
  • 34 time signature
  • Key signature of C major/A minor
  • Key signature of G major/E minor
  • Key signature of F major/D minor
  • F sharp accidental
  • B flat accidental
  • Minims
  • Crotchets
  • Quavers
  • Dotted minims
  • Dotted crotchets
  • Crotchet rest
  • Dotted crotchet rest
  • Minim rest
  • Ties
  • Anacrusis

Lesson types

There are two types of lesson:

  • New input lessons:
    • an exercise introducing a new musical element on recorder
    • a recorder duet to practice that new musical element
    • an exercise introducing new musical elements on percussion
    • a trio comprising the previous duet for recorders plus the new percussion part or parts
    • Performance practice lessons:
    • Two trios for recorders, percussion and often voice to practice more generally what has been learned so far. These trios can be included in the end-of-term public performances which are among the goals of the course

In total there are 20 New input lessons and 13 Performance practice lessons.

The performance practice lesson trios are all well-known popular tunes.

New Input Details

The eleven notes learned are the naturals from C4 to D5 plus F sharp 4 and B flat 4.

All the exercises, duets and trios are provided with piano backing tracks which can be speeded up or slowed down as required and which give a reassuring rhythmic and harmonic basis to the students’ performance.

While performing, the class is split into up to 5 groups:

    • Recorders part 1
    • Recorders part 2
    • Percussion part 1
    • Percussion part 2
    • Singers

In the interests of equality the groups are referred to in these lesson plans as the Tweedledums, the Tweedledees, the Tweedledoos, the Tweedledays and the Tweedledors. The groups constantly rotate through all the activities so no one group appears favoured. Pupils join different groups each lesson.

The percussion parts are in standard drum notation for:

    • Ride cymbal
    • Tom-tom
    • Snare drum
    • Bass drum

A variety of non-pitched instruments may be used to substitute the originals:

    • Ride cymbal – any type of cymbal, triangle, bells
    • Tom-tom – any type of smaller drum, blocks, sticks
    • Snare drum – any type of small drum, shakers, scrapers
    • Bass drum – any type of larger drum

After the essential Instructions at the beginning of Lesson 1, Lesson 1 falls into a New Input Lesson format. Thereafter, all New Input Lessons have an identical format. Performance Practice Lessons have their own different but identical format too. Because of this, the lesson plan prompts on the teacher’s laptop-screen picker-wheel are the same for each lesson of the same type.

The Learning Outcomes/Objectives, New Content, Main Input, Differentiation and Assessments for each Lesson are shown separately.

Missions – Lessons 1 – 11

Lesson 1 New Input Lesson format

Learning Outcomes

    • I can understand the pre-recorded spoken and visual instructions
    • I can answer correctly given comprehension questions about the instructions
    • I can answer correctly given comprehension questions about the three principles of the course’s methodology – reading ahead, not naming notes, and keeping my eyes on the music and not on my hands
    • I have learned a new note – where it is written on the stave and how to produce it on the recorder
    • I can perform the first note on recorder with the given musical accompaniment individually, in a group and as a class
      • I can recognise and perform the ride cymbal percussion part
      • I can perform both parts of the first trio on recorder in a group and as a class
      • I can perform the percussion part of the first trio in a group and as a class
      • I can identify what new material I have learned and what I already knew
      • I can perform the recorder and percussion parts of the exercise, duet and trio over a four bar piece

Main input:

      • Introductory course instructions
      • How to blow in order to produce a pleasant musical note on the recorder
      • The 24 time signature
      • The crotchet (quarter note) note-length
      • The minim (half note) note-length
      • The first note (g4)
    • Where it is written on the stave
    • How to produce it on the recorder
    • Create a Note Guardian Group for this note
      • There are 11 new notes in the course
      • Each group is roughly 1/11th of the class
      • Groups regularly challenge the rest of the class to play their note at sight in a walkabout scenario using their graphic of it
      • The first exercise
    • Putting the note into practice
    • Following the rhythm
    • Reading ahead
    • The first duet
    • Playing as an ensemble
    • Playing both recorder parts in turn
    • Analysing the rhythms of the percussion part
    • The second exercise
    • Analysing the rhythms of the percussion part
    • Playing the percussion part in turn
    • The trio
    • Playing the recorder and percussion parts in turn

Assessment:

    • Class
    • How many beats in a 24 bar? (2)
    • How many crotchets in a 24 bar? (2)
    • How many minims in a 24 bar? (1)
    • Play the first note
    • Individual
    • Write the first note on a blank stave
    • Write the ride cymbal note on a blank stave
    • Peer
    • Peers assess each others’ written work
    • Note Guardian Group tests small groups of the rest of the class

Differentiation:

    • Pairs compare how to blow the first note in a pleasant musical way

Procedure:

    • Play Instructions
    • Repeat as students require
    • Follow the lesson plan picker-wheel prompts

Lesson 2 New Input Lesson format

Learning Outcomes

    • I am aware of good hand positioning and that it facilitates fluent playing
    • I have learned a new note – where it is written on the stave and how to produce it on the recorder
    • I have encountered the music sharp symbol and know that it affects the pitch of a note it is placed before`
    • I can perform the new note on recorder with the given musical accompaniment individually, in a group and as a class
      • I can recognise and perform the snare drum percussion part
      • I can perform both parts of the trio on recorder in a group and as a class
      • I can perform the percussion part of the trio in a group and as a class
      • I can identify what new material I have learned

Main input:

      • Good hand positioning on recorder – minimum movement of the fingers
      • The new note (fsharp4)
    • Where it is written on the stave
    • How to produce it on the recorder
    • practice swapping between the first two notes
    • Create a Note Guardian Group for this note
    • The first exercise
    • Putting the note into practice
    • Following the rhythm
    • Reading ahead
    • The duet
    • Playing as an ensemble
    • Playing both recorder parts in turn
    • The second exercise
    • Analysing the rhythms of the percussion part
    • Distinguishing between the ride cymbal part and the snare drum part in the written music
    • Playing the percussion parts in turn
    • The trio
    • Playing the recorder and percussion parts in turn

Assessment:

    • Class
    • How many beats in a 24 bar? (2)
    • How many crotchets in a 24 bar? (2)
    • How many minims in a 24 bar? (1)
    • Play the first note
    • Play the new note
    • Individual
    • Write the new note on a blank stave
    • Write the snare drum note on a blank stave
    • Peer
    • Peers assess each others’ written work
    • Note Guardian Group tests small groups of the rest of the class

Differentiation:

    • Pairs take turns in controlling their partner’s hand movements by placing their own hand gently over their partner’s

Procedure:

    • Follow the lesson plan picker-wheel prompts

Lesson 3 New Input Lesson format

Learning Outcomes

    • I have learned a new note – where it is written on the stave and how to produce it on the recorder
    • I can perform the new note on recorder with the given musical accompaniment individually, in a group and as a class
      • I can recognise and perform the bass drum percussion part
      • I have learned about quavers (eighth notes) – how they are written and how long they last
      • I can perform both parts of the duet and trio on recorder in a group and as a class
      • I can perform the percussion parts of the trio in a group and as a class
      • I can perform the recorder and percussion parts of the exercise, duet and trio over an eight bar piece
      • I can write a percussion part for the bass drum
      • I can identify what new material I have learned

Main input:

      • The new note (e4)
    • Where it is written on the stave
    • How to produce it on the recorder
    • Practice swapping between it and the previous two notes
    • Create a Note Guardian Group for this note
    • The first exercise
    • Putting the note into practice
    • Following the rhythm
    • Reading ahead
    • The duet
    • Playing as an ensemble
    • Playing both recorder parts in turn
    • The second exercise
    • Analysing the rhythms of the percussion part
    • Distinguishing between the ride cymbal part and the bass drum part in the written music
    • Playing the percussion parts in turn
    • The trio
    • Playing the recorder and percussion parts in turn

Assessment:

    • Class
    • How many quavers in a 24 bar? (4)
    • How many quavers in a crotchet? (2)
    • How many quavers in a minim? (4)
    • Play the previous two notes
    • Play the new note
    • Individual
    • Write the new note on a blank stave
    • Write the bass drum note on a blank stave
    • Peer
    • Peers assess each others’ written work
    • Peers play each others’ written work
    • Note Guardian Group tests small groups of the rest of the class

Differentiation:

    • Pupils write their own 8-bar bass drum part and pairs take turns playing and appraising each other’s

Procedure:

    • Follow the lesson plan picker-wheel prompts

Lesson 4 New Input Lesson format

Learning Outcomes

    • I have learned a new note – where it is written on the stave and how to produce it on the recorder
    • I can perform the new note on recorder with the given musical accompaniment individually, in a group and as a class
      • I can recognise and perform the tom-tom percussion part
      • I can perform both parts of the duet and trio on recorder in a group and as a class
      • I can perform the percussion parts of the trio in a group and as a class
      • I can perform the recorder and percussion parts of the exercise, duet and trio
      • I can write a percussion part for the tom-tom
      • I can write a simple tune for recorder in 24 time
      • I can identify what new material I have learned

Main input:

      • The new note (d4)
    • Where it is written on the stave
    • How to produce it on the recorder
    • Practice swapping between it and the previous two notes
    • Create a Note Guardian Group for this note
    • The first exercise
    • Putting the note into practice
    • Following the rhythm
    • Reading ahead
    • The duet
    • Playing as an ensemble
    • Playing both recorder parts in turn
    • The second exercise
    • Analysing the rhythms of the percussion part
    • Distinguishing between the tom-tom part and the bass drum part in the written music
    • Playing the percussion parts in turn
    • The trio
    • Playing the recorder and percussion parts in turn

Assessment:

Class

    • How many recorder notes have we learned so far? (4)
    • How many percussion notes have we learned so far? (4)
    • Play the previous three notes
    • Play the new note
    • Individual
    • Write the new note on a blank stave
    • Write the tom-tom note on a blank stave
    • Peer
    • Peers assess each others’ written work
    • Peers play each others’ written work, both for recorder and percussion
    • Note Guardian Group tests small groups of the rest of the class

Differentiation:

    • Pupils write their own 8-bar tom-tom drum part and pairs take turns playing and appraising each other’s

Procedure:

    • Follow the lesson plan picker-wheel prompts

Lesson 5 New Input Lesson format

Learning Outcomes

    • I have learned about 34 time and the 34 time signature
    • I can perform the current notes on recorder in 34 time individually, in a group and as a class
    • I can perform both parts of the duet and trio on recorder in a group and as a class
      • I can perform the percussion parts of the trio in a group and as a class
      • I can write a percussion part for the bass drum and ride cymbal in 34 time
      • I can write a simple tune in 34 time
      • I can identify what new material I have learned

Main input:

      • Theory – 34 time
    • There are 3 beats in each bar
    • The first exercise
    • Putting the 34 time signature into practice
    • Following the rhythm
    • Reading ahead
    • The duet
    • Playing as an ensemble
    • Playing both recorder parts in turn
    • The second exercise
    • Analysing the rhythms of the percussion part
    • Distinguishing between the ride cymbal part and the bass drum part in the written music
    • Playing the percussion parts in turn
    • The trio
    • Playing the recorder and percussion parts in turn

Assessment:

Class

    • How beats in a 34 bar? (3)
    • Which is the strong beat? (first beat)

Individual

    • Write a 34 recorder tune on a blank stave
    • Write a 34 ride cymbal part on a blank stave

Peer

    • Peers assess each others’ written work
    • Peers play each others’ work
    • Note Guardian Group tests small groups of the rest of the class

Differentiation:

    • Pupils appraise each others’ recorder and percussion compositions by playing and discussing them

Procedure:

    • Follow the lesson plan picker-wheel prompts

Lesson 6 New Input Lesson format

Learning Outcomes

    • I have learned a new note, where it is written on the stave and how to produce it on the recorder
    • I can perform the new note on recorder with the given musical accompaniment individually, in a group and as a class
    • I have learned about the crotchet rest, where it is written on the stave and how long it lasts
    • I can recognise and perform the ride cymbal percussion part with crotchet rests
    • I have learned to recognise and use the crotchet rest,  where it is written on the stave and how long it lasts
    • I can identify what new material I have learned

Main input:

    • new note on recorder (a4)
    • Crotchet rest in the percussion part
    • The first exercise
    • Practising the new note with previous notes
    • Following the rhythm
    • Reading ahead
    • The duet
    • Playing as an ensemble
    • Playing both recorder parts in turn
    • The second exercise
    • Analysing the rhythms of the percussion part
    • Incorporating the crotchet rest in the ride cymbal part
    • Playing the percussion parts in turn
    • The trio
    • Playing the recorder and percussion parts in turn

Assessment:

Class

    • How many beats does a crotchet rest last? (1)
    • In 34 what is the maximum number of crotchet rests possible in one bar?(3)

Individual

    • Write a 34 ride cymbal with rests part on a blank stave

Peer

    • Peers assess each others’ written work
    • Peers play each others’ work
    • Note Guardian Group tests small groups of the rest of the class

Differentiation:

    • Pupils appraise each others’ percussion compositions by playing and discussing them

Procedure:

    • Follow the lesson plan picker-wheel prompts

Lesson 7 New Input Lesson format

Learning Outcomes

    • I have learned about the dotted minim and how long it lasts
    • I can perform dotted minims using various notes on recorder, with the given musical accompaniment individually, in a group and as a class
    • I can perform the ride cymbal and snare drum percussion parts with two crotchet rests in some bars with crotchet rests
    • I can identify what new material I have learned

Main input:

    • The dotted minim
    • Double crotchet rest in the percussion parts
    • The first exercise
    • Practising the dotted minim with crotchets and minims
    • Following the rhythm
    • Reading ahead
    • The duet
    • Playing as an ensemble
    • Playing both recorder parts in turn
    • The second exercise
    • Analysing the rhythms of the percussion part
    • Incorporating the double crotchet rests in the ride cymbal and snare drum parts
    • Playing the percussion parts in turn
    • The trio
    • Playing the recorder and percussion parts in turn

Assessment:

Class

    • How many beats does a dotted minim last? (3)
    • Can you have a dotted minim in a 24 bar? (no)

Individual

    • Write a 34 tune for recorder using dotted minims on a blank stave

Peer

    • Peers play and appraise each others’ work
    • Note Guardian Group tests small groups of the rest of the class

Differentiation:

    • Pupils appraise each others’ recorder compositions by playing and discussing them

Procedure:

    • Follow the lesson plan picker-wheel prompts

Lesson 8 New Input Lesson format

Learning Outcomes

    • I have learned a new note, where it is written on the stave and how to produce it on the recorder
    • I can perform the new note on recorder with the given musical accompaniment individually, in a group and as a class
    • I can perform the ride cymbal percussion part with a rest followed by two quavers in some bars, producing off-beat syncopation
    • I have revised the 24 time signature
    • I can identify what new material I have learned

Main input:

    • New recorder note (b4)
    • The off-beat
    • Double quavers in the percussion parts
    • The first exercise
    • Practising the new note
    • Following the rhythm
    • Reading ahead
    • The duet
    • Playing as an ensemble
    • Playing both recorder parts in turn
    • The second exercise
    • Analysing the rhythms of the percussion part
    • Incorporating the crotchets and double quavers in the ride cymbal part
    • Playing the percussion part in turn
    • The trio
    • Playing the recorder and percussion parts in turn

Assessment:

Class

    • How many quavers in one beat? (2)
    • What is another name for a quaver? (eighth note)

Individual

    • Write a 34 tune for recorder using double quavers on a blank stave

 Peer

    • Peers play and appraise each others’ work
    • Note Guardian Group tests small groups of the rest of the class

Differentiation:

    • Pupils appraise each others’ recorder compositions by playing and discussing them

Procedure:

    • Follow the lesson plan picker-wheel prompts

Lesson 9 New Input Lesson format

Learning Outcomes

    • I have learned a new note, where it is written on the stave and how to produce it on the recorder
    • I can perform the new note on recorder with the given musical accompaniment individually, in a group and as a class
    • I have practised changing between the c5 and b4 hand positions
    • I can perform both the bass drum and tom-tom drum percussion parts
    • I can identify what new material I have learned

Main input:

    • New recorder note (c5)
    • Double quavers on the second 34 beat in the percussion parts
    • The first exercise
    • Practising the new note
    • Practising the new note by changing freely between it and the previous b4 note to increase manual dexterity
    • Following the rhythm
    • Reading ahead
    • The duet
    • Playing as an ensemble
    • Playing both recorder parts in turn
    • The second exercise
    • Analysing the rhythms of the percussion parts
    • Incorporating the double quavers in the tom-tom drum part
    • Playing the percussion parts in turn
    • The trio
    • Playing the recorder and percussion parts in turn

Assessment:

Class

    • Which beat is the tom-tom part on in the first three bars? (second)
    • Which beats is the bass drum on in the first three bars? (first and third)

Individual

    • Write a 34 tune for recorder using the new note on a blank stave

Peer

    • Peers play and appraise each others’ work
    • Note Guardian Group tests small groups of the rest of the class

Differentiation:

    • Pupils appraise each others’ recorder compositions by playing and discussing them

Procedure:

    • Follow the lesson plan picker-wheel prompts

Lesson 10 New Input Lesson format

Learning Outcomes

    • I have learned a new note, where it is written on the stave and how to produce it on the recorder
    • I can perform the new note on recorder with the given musical accompaniment individually, in a group and as a class
    • I have practised changing between the d5, c5 and b4 hand positions
    • I can perform both the snare drum and ride cymbal percussion parts moving from on-beat to off-beat in successive bars
    • I can identify what new material I have learned

Main input:

    • New recorder note (d5)
    • Successive on and off beats in the two percussion parts
    • The first exercise
    • Practising the new note
    • Practising the new note by changing freely between it and the previous c5 and b4 notes to increase manual dexterity – d5-c5-b4-c5-d5-c5-b4-c5 repeating freely
    • Following the rhythm
    • Reading ahead
    • The duet
    • Playing as an ensemble
    • Playing both recorder parts in turn
    • The second exercise
    • Analysing the rhythms of the percussion parts
    • Successfully playing the on-beat and off-beat percussion parts
    • Playing the percussion parts in turn
    • The trio
    • Playing the recorder and percussion parts in turn

Assessment:

Class

    • Is the on-beat on the first or second beat of a 24 bar? (first beat)
    • Is the off-beat on the first or second beat of a 24 bar? (second beat)
    • In the first bar is the tom-tom on the on-beat or the off-beat? (on-beat)
    • In the first bar is the ride cymbal part on the on-beat or the off-beat? (off-beat)

Individual

    • Write a four bar 24 percussion part for tom-tom and ride cymbal mixing the on and off beats between them on a blank stave

Peer

    • Peers play and appraise each others’ work
    • Note Guardian Group tests small groups of the rest of the class

Differentiation:

    • Pupils appraise each others’ recorder compositions by playing and discussing them

Procedure:

    • Follow the lesson plan picker-wheel prompts

Lesson 11 Performance Practice Lesson format

Learning Outcomes

    • I have performed a 32-bar trio in 24 and a 24-bar trio in 34, singing and playing both recorder parts and both percussion parts in turn
    • I have performed these trios over several loops round the verses, repeating the material each time
    • I can perform both the bass drum and ride cymbal percussion parts moving from on-beat to off-beat double quavers in successive bars
    • I have learned about the minim rest, where it is written on the stave and how long it lasts
    • I have played a percussion part containing both crotchet and minim rests
    • I can identify what new material I have learned
    • I can take part in the performance of a selection of the trios and duets from Lessons 1 – 11 in a public end-of-term concert

Main input:

    • Song – Old MacDonald’s Farm
    • Song – Man’s Life’s a Vapour (simple round)
    • Reading ahead
    • The duet
    • Playing as an ensemble
    • Playing both recorder parts in turn
    • The second exercise
    • Analysing the rhythms of the percussion parts
    • Successfully playing the on-beat and off-beat percussion parts
    • Playing the percussion parts in turn
    • The trio
    • Playing the recorder and percussion parts in turn

Assessment:

Individual

    • Write a the first four bars of the tune of Old MacDonald’s Farm on a blank stave

Peer

    • Peers play and appraise each others’ work
    • Note Guardian Group tests small groups of the rest of the class

Differentiation:

    • Pupils appraise each others’ versions of the first four bars of the tune of Old MacDonald’s Farm by playing and discussing them

Procedure:

    • Follow the lesson plan picker-wheel prompts

LESSON FORMATS

Lesson 1 only:

Part 1: Introduction

Part 2: New Input Format (see below)

Introduce the course

    • The course is for recorders, percussion and voice
    • Everyone has the chance to play everything
    • Groups will be absolutely equal:
    • Group names are Tweedledums, Tweedledees, Tweedledoos, Tweedledays and Tweedledors
    • Pupils will be assigned to new groups each lesson or part of a lesson
    • Pupils are going to learn to play music at sight from standard musical notation
    • It’s step by step
    • There will be plenty of opportunities to practice it
    • It’s like riding a bike – when you get the hang of it you’re okay
    • There are instructions which will make this clear
    • Any questions?
    • Play the Instructions
    • Repeat as required
    • Ask the comprehension questions
      • Instructions 1
        • How many different notes in the first exercise? (2)
        • Do you have to know the names of the notes to read them well? (No)
      • Instructions 2
        • When do you see a new recorder chart? (When you learn a new note)
      • Instructions 3
        • What is another name for a quarter note? (Crotchet)
        • How long does a quarter note last? (One beat)
      • Instructions 4
        • What are the numbers on the time signature? (2, 4)
        • How many quarter notes are there in each bar? (2)
      • Instructions 5
        • What is another name for a half note? (Minim)
        • How long does a half note last? (Two beats)
      • Instructions 6
        • Do good sight readers play the note they’re looking at? (No)
      • Instructions 7
        • What do they memorise? (Group of notes)
      • Instructions 8
        • How many clicks in 24?
        • When do you play bar one? (While you read bar two)
      • Instructions 9
        • How many notes in the very last bar? (None)
      • Instructions 10
        • It’s a very simple tune isn’t it!
          • As you learn more notes the tunes will get more exciting
          • You’ll soon be playing tunes you know
      • Instructions 11
        • How many bars are shown at one time? (One)
        • The tempo means the speed of the music. Can we change it? (Yes)
      • Instructions 12
        • What is the first thing you hear when you start an exercise? (The clicks)
      • Instructions 13
        • What does the symbol on the first bar mean? (Don’t play)
        • What does the symbol on the second bar mean? (Play)
        • Review as relevant
        • Proceed with New Input Lesson format (Part 2/2 in this lesson)
    • Follow the prompts on the Lesson Plan Picker Wheel
    • Refer to Specific Lesson Contents for Lesson 1

New Input:

The Lessons which use this format are: 1-10, 12-13, 15-16, 18-19, 21-22, 24, 26.

(These main headings are the prompts which appear on the lesson plan picker-wheel)

    • Review comp questions
    • Review first recorder note
    • Practice new note
    • Sing new note
    • Screen Exercise 1
    • Any Questions?
    • Tweedledees first
    • Now Tweedledums
    • Now together
    • Reminds you of..?
    • Repeat? Tempo?
    • Screen the duet
    • Any questions?
    • Tweedledums, top part
    • Repeat? Tempo?
    • Tweedledums, top part
    • Repeat? Tempo?
    • All, top part
    • Reminds you of..?
    • Repeat? Tempo?
    • Tweedledees, bottom part
    • Repeat? Tempo?
    • Tweedledums, bottom part
    • Repeat? Tempo?
    • All, bottom part
    • Repeat? Tempo?
    • All, T’dums top/T’dees bottom
    • Repeat? Tempo?
    • All, T’dees top/T’dums bottom
    • Repeat? Tempo?
    • Change instruments
    • Review first percussion note
    • Screen Exercise 2
    • Any questions?
    • T’dums first
    • Repeat? Tempo?
    • Now T’dees
    • Repeat? Tempo?
    • Create four groups
    • T’doos, top recorder part
    • T’days, bottom recorder part
    • T’dums, ride cymbal part
    • T’dees, tom-tom part
    • Screen trio
    • Play trio
    • Reminds you of..?
    • Repeat? Tempo?
    • Rotate group #1
    • Play trio
    • Repeat? Tempo?
    • Rotate group #2
    • Play trio
    • Repeat? Tempo?
    • Rotate group #3
    • Write rec note
    • Write perc note
    • New Guardians if new note(s)
    • Guardians test others

Performance Practice:

The Lessons which use this format are: 11, 14, 17, 20, 23, 25, 27-33

    • Create two groups
    • T’dums
    • T’dees
    • Screen trio 1
    • T’dums, top part
    • Repeat? Tempo?
    • T’dees, top part
    • Repeat? Tempo?
    • All, top part
    • Repeat? Tempo?
    • T’dees, middle part
    • Repeat? Tempo?
    • T’dums, middle part
    • Repeat? Tempo?
    • All, middle part
    • T’dees, middle part
    • Repeat? Tempo?
    • T’dums, first perc
    • Repeat? Tempo?
    • T’dums, first perc
    • Repeat? Tempo?
    • All, first perc
    • T’dums, second perc
    • Repeat? Tempo?
    • T’dees, second perc
    • Repeat? Tempo?
    • All,  second perc
    • Create five groups
    • T’doos, top recorder part
    • T’days, bottom recorder part
    • T’dums, first perc
    • T’dees, second perc
    • T’dors, voice (?)
    • Play trio
    • Reminds you of..?
    • Repeat? Tempo?
    • Rotate group #1
    • Play trio
    • Repeat? Tempo?
    • Rotate group #2
    • Play trio
    • Repeat? Tempo?
    • Rotate group #3
    • Rotate group #2
    • Play trio
    • Repeat? Tempo?
    • Critiques

Create new groups and repeat this process for Trio Two, spinning the Lesson Plan Picker Wheel back to the beginning.

SONG LIST

Song List

From the USA

    • Yankee Doodle
    • Home on the Range
    • Oh Susanna
    • Streets of Laredo
    • Red River Valley
    • Campdown Races
    • Banks of the Ohio
    • Clementine
    • When the Saints
    • Old Man River
    • Morning Has Broken

From England and Scotland

    • My Grandfather’s Clock
    • London’s Burning
    • Man’s Life’s a Vapour
    • The Water Is Wide
    • For He’s a Jolly Good Fellow
    • The Mingulay Boatsong

From Ireland

    • Molly Malone
    • The Wild Rover
    • The Spanish Lady

From France

    • L’Apres Midi d’une Faune
    • La Claire de la Lune

Children’s Songs

    • Old MacDonald
    • Knick Knack Paddiwhack

From Catalonia

    • El Noi de la Mare

From Australia

    • Waltzing Matilda

Pricing and Availability

Details to be announced.